Sea Otter Legalities
Steller Sea Lion Legalities
Federal Regulations
 
  • WHAT IS LEGAL?

    The Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) was passed in 1972 which created a moratorium on the taking of marine mammals by U.S. citizens within the United States and its jurisdiction. The MMPA also created a moratorium on the import and export of marine mammal parts and products into the United States.

    Congress recognized the cultural importance of marine mammals to Alaska Native peoples when the act was passed. Included in the MMPA is a Native exemption in Section 101(b) that provides for Alaska Native take of marine mammals for subsistence or handicraft purposes, provided that the take is non-wasteful.

    Specifically, the MMPA Section 101(b) states: (16 U.S.C. 1371)

    Exemptions for Alaskan Natives ...

    "Except as provided in section 1379 of this title, the provisions of this chapter shall not apply with respect to the taking of any marine mammal by any Indian, Aleut, or Eskimo who resides in Alaska and who dwells on the coast of the North Pacific Ocean or the Arctic Ocean if such taking -

    "(1) is for subsistence purposes; or

    "(2) is done for purposes of creating and selling authentic native articles of handicrafts and clothing: Provided, That only authentic native articles of handicrafts and clothing may be sold in interstate commerce: And provided further, That any edible portion of marine mammals may be sold in native villages and towns in Alaska or for native consumption. For the purposes of this subsection, the term ''authentic native articles of handicrafts and clothing'' means items composed wholly or in some significant respect of natural materials, and which are produced, decorated, or fashioned in the exercise of traditional native handicrafts without the use of pantographs, multiple carvers, or other mass copying devices. Traditional native handicrafts include, but are not limited to weaving, carving, stitching, sewing, lacing, beading, drawing and painting; and

    "(3) in each case, is not accomplished in a wasteful manner."

    A similar exemption exists in Section 10(e) of the Endangered Species Act:

    (e) ALASKA NATIVES.-

    (1) Except as provided in paragraph (4) of this subsection the provisions of this Act shall not apply with respect to the taking of any endangered species or threatened species, or the importation of any such species taken pursuant to this section, by-
    (A) any Indian, Aleut, or Eskimo who is an Alaskan Native who resides in Alaska; ...
    (B) ...Non-edible byproducts of species taken pursuant to this section may be sold in interstate commerce when made into authentic native articles of handicrafts and clothing; ...


    (2) Any taking under this subsection may not be accomplished in a wasteful manner.

    (3) As used in this subsection-
    (i) The term "subsistence" includes selling any edible portion of fish or wildlife in native villages and towns in Alaska for native consumption within native villages or towns; and
    (ii) The term "authentic native articles of handicrafts and clothing" means items composed wholly or in some significant respect to natural materials, and which are produced, decorated or fashioned in the exercise of traditional native handicrafts without the use of pantographs, multiple carvers, or other mass copying devices. Traditional native handicrafts include, but are not limited to, weaving, carving, stitching, sewing, lacing, beading, drawing, and painting.
    (4) Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph (1) of this subsection, whenever the Secretary determines that any species of fish or wildlife which is subject to taking under the provisions of this subsection is an endangered species or threatened species, and that such taking materially and negatively affects the threatened or endangered species, he may prescribe regulations upon the taking of such species by any such Indian, Aleut, Eskimo, or non-native Alaskan resident of an Alaskan native village. Such regulations may be established with reference to species, geographical description of the area included, the season for taking, or any other factors related to the reason for establishing such regulations and consistent with the policy of this Act. Such regulations shall be prescribed after a notice and hearings in the affected judicial districts of Alaska and as otherwise required by section 103 of the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, and shall be removed as soon as the Secretary determines that the need for their impositions has disappeared.

    Federal Regulations Defining Alaskan Native

    As defined in the regulations (50 CFR 216.3), Alaskan Native "means a person defined in the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1602(b)) (85 Stat. 588) as a citizen of the United States who is of one-fourth degree or more Alaska Indian (including Tsimishian Indians enrolled or not enrolled in the Metlaktla Indian Community), Eskimo, or Aleut blood or combination thereof. The term includes any Native, as so defined, either or both of whose adoptive parents are not Natives. It also includes, in the absence of proof of a minimum blood quantum, any citizen of the United States who is regarded as an Alaska Native by the Native village or group, of which he claims to be a member and whose father or mother is (or, if deceased, was) regarded as Native by any Native village or Native group. Any such citizen enrolled by the Secretary of the Interior pursuant to section 5 of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act shall be conclusively presumed to be an Alaskan Native for purposes of this part.

     


    Related Links and Downloads:

    Seal skin slippers with beaver trim. Jack Collection.

     

    Ivory Steller sea lion rookery. Jack Collection.

     

    Carved oosik with polar bear detail. Jack Collection.

     

     
       

     

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    25 February 2016

     
           

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